Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's a lot better, and we figure your battery glitch was just that thermal switch triggered a mal—a CAUTION and WARNING, just cycled once, and triggered a MASTER ALARM again. We'll watch the batteries for you, since you don't have any CAUTION and WARNING on now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Appreciate that.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. Your luck is holding. Tracking shows that your entry angle has gone up to minus 6.24. This is on the basis of all the data we've collected between the midcourse up to the time the SHe tank went. So we'll continue to look at it, and see if SHe tank did anything to it at all. So it's—The data has gone from 5.9 to a minus 6.24.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That sounds pretty good. We're really getting in there.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Not bad. Not bad at all.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Is Jack in the sack, or is he with you?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Jack and Fred both are going to sleep. It's sort of humorous; Fred's sleeping place now is in the tunnel, upside down with his head resting on the ascent engine. Jack is on the floor of the LM, with a restraint … wrapped around his arm to keep him down there.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

You say Jack is on the floor, and Fred is with his head on the ascent engine.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's right, with his feet up into the tunnel.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Skipper. Your luck is really hanging in there. Your water's good up to 161 hours now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Hey, that sounds great.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That doesn't include PLSS water or command module water.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Jack, I'd just like to know what—what plans or thoughts being contemplated for the PLSSs or the OPS, whether we're going to use their LiOH canisters or take the devices back in the command module with us, or just what will be your plans.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. We're talking all that over now. We haven't decided.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Everything's running real smooth over in Timber Cove, Jim.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Sounds pretty good. How about at El Lago?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Same. Everything's smooth there, too.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, we've had a lot of people working on the entry procedures, and they'll be continuing to do so. We got a few ideas we'd like to toss at you so you can start thinking about them if you think you're in a position to discuss them without waking up the other guys. What do you think?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, go ahead. It's okay.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. One of the first things we want to do is charge the battery in CSM, so we can get some LM power over there to do that, and we have procedures ginned up to do it. In regards to reentry, we're planning our last midcourse at 5 hours before entry interface, and, if we have to make one, that is. And then we'd like to jettison the service module at 4 hours and a half, roughly, before entry interface, and take the next 3 to 3-1/2 hours for taking pictures, cranking up the command module G&N, taking care of stowage, and other odds and ends. And we'd hang on to the LM until 1 hour before entry interface, and then we'd jettison that. And these procedures are going to be run integrated in the CMS and LMS tomorrow morning, and, hopefully, later on in the day, we'll do it again with Mission Control on the loop. A couple of other things we'd like to toss at you: one question is what do we do with the OPS. The thought is that there is adequate O2 in the command module and that the OPS represents high pressure source and a stowage problem, and people are thinking about leaving them in the LM. The other thing is that we think you might want to make this a suited entry, suiting up prior to LM jettison, because what we're doing is, when we jettison the LM, we're going to do it like we did in Apollo 10—just let the beauty go, and if we weren't suited, why, we'd be betting on the hatch seal to take care of us. So we thought we'd toss these few ideas at you. Some of them are ones that are particularly pertinent questions at this time.

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Spoken on April 16, 1970, 9:36 a.m. UTC (47 years, 5 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. A suited entry would sort of … the 1-hour LM jettison back and … back and forth up to that time. … impede our progress back and forth. …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I think I've got you back. I guess the midcourse at 5 hours prior to …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Affirmative, Jim. Midcourse 5 hours prior to entry interface.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

If that's the case, all I'm worried about is having that all squared away. It's long before that … I want everything in its place. All the stowage cleared away, all the … ready to go and know exactly what to do and … so that we can do the midcourse, and … get into the command module … jettison the service module, and then know exactly how to get into the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. All those procedures will work—will be worked out precisely, and we agree that the stowage and all of those peripheral details ought to be taken care of before midcourse.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And, I guess, that last midcourse, we'd want to start looking at midcourse fairly early, if we have the power to do so, mainly because of attitude control. This last time was fairly easy, but I'm not too sure how long we can continue to …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I have … in, and it seems about as cold as it is now, we'll probably be going into suits long before entry.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. That's what we were thinking.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I guess the two things which are somewhat unresolved at the moment are what to do with the OPS and what to do about the suited entry. We thought we'd toss those at you to see what you thought about them.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. As far as the OPS is concerned, we have enough oxygen in the spacecraft … to get us through. I have no … command module … suit loop prior to entry. I was looking at … OPS … sources of oxygen … also in the—in the front of the suit loop or … circulate …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I'm sorry. We're not catching what you're saying. The COMM is getting kind of bad right now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. How do you read now?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I've still got you with quite a bit of background noise, but if you talk up like that, I think we can hear you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. My only concern about leaving the OPS and/or the PLSS in the command module is how soon do we have to live off the command module consumables prior to entry, and the PLSS has a fan and has a lithium hydroxide … use the command module system. Also, the OPS … right now … command module … command module oxygen and electrical power is … but I had just as soon be … back in the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

It sounds like the general gist of your comments are that if things remain pretty much as they are now in the command module, you'd just as soon leave the OPS in the LM. Is that affirm?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And maybe you'd like to think over the suited entry bit a little while.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay … How we aline the command module right for entry, especially if you have the LM in back. Over.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's one subject that's been getting a lot of attention, and let me see if I can get some general ideas on that at the moment.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I can give you the general idea of the proposed procedure for bringing the command module G&N up. It's the presently proposed one. We may come up with a better one, but here's what we're looking at right now. First thing we plan to do is to—using the LM COAS, sight on the Earth with the LM just as we did in the midcourse. Then we'll do a body-axis aline, 400 plus 5 on the ACS, to put the AGS ball at 000. And then we can give you an AGS ball attitude to fly to, to point the CSM optics at the Moon. And, if you can see stars, why, we can use those too. Then we can give you an equivalent set of CDU angles to put into NOUN 20 and to torque the platform over. So, now we're coarse alined. Then we do a fine aline by shooting at the Moon and then at the Sun. Do you follow all that?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. Let me see if I have it. What we do is point the LM at the Earth as we did for the midcourse COAS, and we do a body-axis aline on the AGS. Then you give us an AGS ball attitude to fly to. … the LM, and then we … point the … at the Moon. Then you would update the—give us some CDUs to coarse aline. … fine aline … on stars or the Moon or the Earth. Stand by. Okay. We had another MASTER ALARM, Jack. I don't see any lights down there, except the battery light's still there. You want — … display ECS. Okay. And the number 2 battery still has a light on it. I suspect it may be the same problem that we had before … …